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Aviation Weather Services

AIRMETs (WAs) are examples of inflight weather advisories that are issued every 6 hours with intermediate updates issued as needed for a particular area forecast region. The information contained in an AIRMET is of operational interest to all aircraft, but the weather section concerns phenomena considered potentially hazardous to light aircraft and aircraft with limited operational capabilities.

An AIRMET includes forecast of moderate icing, moderate turbulence, sustained surface winds of 30 knots or greater, widespread areas of ceilings less than 1,000 feet and/or visibilities less than three miles, and extensive mountain obscurement.

Each AIRMET bulletin has a fixed alphanumeric designator, numbered sequentially for easy identification, beginning with the first issuance of the day. Sierra is the AIRMET code used to denote IFR and mountain obscuration; Tango is used to denote turbulence, strong surface winds, and low-level wind shear; and Zulu is used to denote icing and freezing levels.

Example:

DFWTWA 241650

AIRMET TANGO UPDT 3 FOR TURBC… STG

SFC WINDS AND LLWS VALID UNTIL 242000

AIRMET TURBC… OK TX…UPDT

FROM OKC TO DFW TO SAT TO MAF TO CDS

TO OKC OCNL MDT TURBC BLO 60 DUE TO

STG AND GUSTY LOW LVL WINDS. CONDS

CONTG BYD 2000Z

Explanation:

This AIRMET was issued by Dallas–Fort Worth on the 24th day of the month, at 1650Z time. On this third update, the AIRMET Tango is issued for turbulence, strong surface winds, and low-level wind shear until 2000Z on the same day. The turbulence section of the AIRMET is an update for Oklahoma and Texas. It defines an area from Oklahoma City to Dallas, Texas, to San Antonio, to Midland, Texas, to Childress, Texas, to Oklahoma City that will experience occasional moderate turbulence below 6,000 feet due to strong and gusty low-level winds. It also notes that these conditions are forecast to continue beyond 2000Z.

515G+mn0RuL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Learn more about aviation weather with Weather Flying by Robert Buck. Regarded as the bible of weather flying, this aviation classic not only continues to make complex weather concepts understandable for even the least experienced of flyers, but has now been updated to cover new advances in technology.

 

 

Graphical METARs

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Weather Charts – Radar Summary Chart

A radar summary chart is a graphically depicted collection of radar weather reports (SDs). [Figure 12-17] The chart is published hourly at 35 minutes past the hour. It displays areas of precipitation, as well as information regarding the characteristics of the precipitation. [Figure 12-18] A radar summary chart includes: No information—if information is not reported, […]

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Weather Charts – Weather Depiction Chart

A weather depiction chart details surface conditions as derived from METAR and other surface observations. The weather depiction chart is prepared and transmitted by computer every 3 hours beginning at 0100Z time, and is valid at the time of the plotted data. It is designed to be used for flight planning by giving an overall […]

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