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Aircraft Performance

Performance Charts – Crosswind and Headwind Component Charts

Aircraft Performance

Every aircraft is tested according to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations prior to certification. The aircraft is tested by a pilot with average piloting skills in 90° crosswinds with a velocity up to 0.2 VSO or two-tenths of the aircraft’s stalling speed with power off, gear down, and flaps down. This means that if the […]

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Performance Charts – Climb and Cruise Charts (Part Two)

Aircraft Performance

The next example is a cruise and range performance chart. This type of table is designed to give TAS, fuel consumption, endurance in hours, and range in miles at specific cruise configurations. Use Figure 10-26 to determine the cruise and range performance under the given conditions. Sample Problem 6 Pressure Altitude………………………………………..5,000 feet RPM…………………………………………………………2,400 rpm Fuel […]

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Performance Charts – Climb and Cruise Charts (Part One)

Aircraft Performance

Climb and cruise chart information is based on actual flight tests conducted in an aircraft of the same type. This information is extremely useful when planning a cross-country to predict the performance and fuel consumption of the aircraft. Manufacturers produce several different charts for climb and cruise performance. These charts include everything from fuel, time, […]

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Performance Charts – Takeoff Charts

Aircraft Performance

Takeoff charts are typically provided in several forms and allow a pilot to compute the takeoff distance of the aircraft with no flaps or with a specific flap configuration. A pilot can also compute distances for a no flap takeoff over a 50 foot obstacle scenario, as well as with flaps over a 50 foot […]

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Performance Charts – Density Altitude Charts

Aircraft Performance

Use a density altitude chart to figure the density altitude at the departing airport. Using Figure 10-21, determine the density altitude based on the given information. Sample Problem 1 Airport Elevation………………………………………..5,883 feet OAT…………………………………………………………………70 °F Altimeter…………………………………………………..30.10″ Hg First, compute the pressure altitude conversion. Find 30.10 under the altimeter heading. Read across to the second column. It […]

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Performance Charts – Interpolation

Aircraft Performance

Not all of the information on the charts is easily extracted. Some charts require interpolation to find the information for specific flight conditions. Interpolating information means that by taking the known information, a pilot can compute intermediate information. However, pilots sometimes round off values from charts to a more conservative figure. Using values that reflect […]

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Performance Charts

Aircraft Performance

Performance charts allow a pilot to predict the takeoff, climb, cruise, and landing performance of an aircraft. These charts, provided by the manufacturer, are included in the AFM/POH. Information the manufacturer provides on these charts has been gathered from test flights conducted in a new aircraft, under normal operating conditions while using average piloting skills, […]

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Performance Speeds

Aircraft Performance

True Airspeed (TAS)—the speed of the aircraft in relation to the air mass in which it is flying. Indicated Airspeed (IAS)—the speed of the aircraft as observed on the ASI. It is the airspeed without correction for indicator, position (or installation), or compressibility errors. Calibrated Airspeed (CAS)—the ASI reading corrected for position (or installation), and […]

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Landing Performance (Part Two)

Aircraft Performance

The effect of proper landing speed is important when runway lengths and landing distances are critical. The landing speeds specified in the AFM/POH are generally the minimum safe speeds at which the aircraft can be landed. Any attempt to land at below the specified speed may mean that the aircraft may stall, be difficult to […]

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