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Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)

in Navigation Systems

The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is a constellation of satellites providing a high-frequency signal which contains time and distance that is picked up by a receiver thereby. [Figure 7-27] The receiver which picks up multiple signals from different satellites is able to triangulate its position from these satellites.


Figure 7-27. A typical example (GNS 480) of a stand-alone GPS receiver and display.

Figure 7-27. A typical example (GNS 480) of a stand-alone GPS receiver and display.

Three GNSSs exist today: the GPS, a United States system; the Russian GNSS (GLONASS); and Galileo, a European system.

  1. GLONASS is a network of 24 satellites, which can be picked up by any GLONASS receiver, allowing the user to pinpoint their position.
  2. Galileo is a network of 30 satellites that continuously transmit high-frequency radio signals containing time and distance data that can be picked up by a Galileo receiver with operational expectancy by 2008.
  3. The GPS came on line in 1992 with 24 satellites, and today utilizes 30 satellites.

 

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