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Airplane Basic Flight Maneuvers Using Analog Instrumentation – Straight-and-Level Flight – Pitch Control (Part Four) Airspeed Indicator (ASI)

in Airplane Basic Flight Maneuvers - Analog Instrumentation

The ASI presents an indirect indication of the pitch attitude. In non-turbulent conditions with a constant power setting and pitch attitude, airspeed remains constant. [Figure 7-13] As the pitch attitude lowers, airspeed increases, and the nose should be raised. [Figure 7-14] As the pitch attitude rises, airspeed decreases, and the nose should be lowered. [Figure 7-15] A rapid change in airspeed indicates a large pitch change, and a slow change of airspeed indicates a small pitch change.


Figure 7-13. Constant power plus constant pitch equals constant speed.

Figure 7-13. Constant power plus constant pitch equals constant speed.

Figure 7-14. Constant power plus decreased pitch equals increased airspeed.

Figure 7-14. Constant power plus decreased pitch equals increased airspeed.

Figure 7-15. Constant power plus increased pitch equals decreased airspeed.

Figure 7-15. Constant power plus increased pitch equals decreased airspeed.

 

Pitch control in level flight is a question of cross-check and interpretation of the instrument panel for the instrument information that enables a pilot to visualize and control pitch attitude. Regardless of individual differences in cross-check technique, all pilots should use the instruments that give the best information for controlling the airplane in any given maneuver. Pilots should also check the other instruments to aid in maintaining the primary instruments at the desired indication.

As noted previously, the primary instrument is the one that gives the most pertinent information for a particular maneuver. It is usually the one that should be held at a constant indication. Which instrument is primary for pitch control in level flight, for example? This question should be considered in the context of specific airplane, weather conditions, pilot experience, operational conditions, and other factors. Attitude changes must be detected and interpreted instantly for immediate control action in high performance airplanes. On the other hand, a reasonably proficient instrument pilot in a slower airplane may rely more on the altimeter for primary pitch information, especially if it is determined that too much reliance on the attitude indicator fails to provide the necessary precise attitude information. Whether the pilot decides to regard the altimeter or the attitude indicator as primary depends on which approach will best help control the attitude. On this website, the altimeter is normally considered as the primary pitch instrument during level flight.

 

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