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Pilot Weather Reports (PIREP)

in Aviation Weather Services

PIREPs provide valuable information regarding the conditions as they actually exist in the air, which cannot be gathered from any other source. Pilots can confirm the height of bases and tops of clouds, locations of wind shear and turbulence, and the location of inflight icing. If the ceiling is below 5,000 feet, or visibility is at or below five miles, ATC facilities are required to solicit PIREPs from pilots in the area. When unexpected weather conditions are encountered, pilots are encouraged to make a report to a FSS or ATC. When a pilot weather report is filed, the ATC facility or FSS will add it to the distribution system to brief other pilots and provide inflight advisories.

PIREPs are easy to file and a standard reporting form outlines the manner in which they should be filed. Figure 12-10 shows the elements of a PIREP form. Item numbers 1 through 5 are required information when making a report, as well as at least one weather phenomenon encountered. A PIREP is normally transmitted as an individual report, but may be appended to a surface report. Pilot reports are easily decoded and most contractions used in the reports are self-explanatory.

Figure 12-10. PIREP encoding and decoding.

Figure 12-10. PIREP encoding and decoding.

Example:

UA/OV GGG 090025/TM 1450/FL 060/TP C182/SK

080 OVC/WX FV 04R/TA 05/WV 270030/TB LGT/RM HVY RAIN

Explanation:

  • Type: ……………………………Routine pilot report
  • Location: …………………….. 25 NM out on the 090° radial, Gregg County VOR
  • Time: ………………………….. 1450 Zulu
  • Altitude or Flight Level: …..6,000 feet
  • Aircraft Type: ………………. Cessna 182
  • Sky Cover: …………………… 8,000 overcast
  • Visibility/Weather: ……….. 4 miles in rain
  • Temperature: …………………5 °Celsius
  • Wind: ………………………….. 270° at 30 knots
  • Turbulence: …………………..Light
  • Icing: ………………………….. None reported
  • Remarks: …………………….. Rain is heavy

 

515G+mn0RuL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Learn more about aviation weather with Weather Flying by Robert Buck. Regarded as the bible of weather flying, this aviation classic not only continues to make complex weather concepts understandable for even the least experienced of flyers, but has now been updated to cover new advances in technology.

 

 

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