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Fronts

in Weather Theory

As an air mass moves across bodies of water and land, it eventually comes in contact with another air mass with different characteristics. The boundary layer between two types of air masses is known as a front. An approaching front of any type always means changes to the weather are imminent.


There are four types of fronts, which are named according to the temperature of the advancing air relative to the temperature of the air it is replacing: [Figure 11-25]

  • Warm
  • Cold
  • Stationary
  • Occluded

Any discussion of frontal systems must be tempered with the knowledge that no two fronts are the same. However, generalized weather conditions are associated with a specific type of front that helps identify the front.

Figure 11-25. Common chart symbology to depict weather front location.

Figure 11-25. Common chart symbology to depict weather front location.

515G+mn0RuL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Learn more about aviation weather with Weather Flying by Robert Buck. Regarded as the bible of weather flying, this aviation classic not only continues to make complex weather concepts understandable for even the least experienced of flyers, but has now been updated to cover new advances in technology.

 

 

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