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Wind Patterns

by Flight Learnings

in Weather Theory

In the Northern Hemisphere, the flow of air from areas of high to low pressure is deflected to the right and produces a clockwise circulation around an area of high pressure. This is known as anticyclonic circulation. The opposite is true of low-pressure areas; the air flows toward a low and is deflected to create a counterclockwise or cyclonic circulation. [Figure 11-10]

Figure 11-10. Circulation pattern about areas of high and low pressure.

Figure 11-10. Circulation pattern about areas of high and low pressure.

High pressure systems are generally areas of dry, stable, descending air. Good weather is typically associated with high pressure systems for this reason. Conversely, air flows into a low pressure area to replace rising air. This air tends to be unstable, and usually brings increasing cloudiness and precipitation. Thus, bad weather is commonly associated with areas of low pressure.

A good understanding of high and low pressure wind patterns can be of great help when planning a flight, because a pilot can take advantage of beneficial tailwinds. [Figure 11-11] When planning a flight from west to east, favorable winds would be encountered along the northern side of a high pressure system or the southern side of a low pressure system. On the return flight, the most favorable winds would be along the southern side of the same high pressure system or the northern side of a low pressure system. An added advantage is a better understanding of what type of weather to expect in a given area along a route of flight based on the prevailing areas of highs and lows.

Figure 11-11. Favorable winds near a high pressure system.

Figure 11-11. Favorable winds near a high pressure system. - Click to Enlarge -

While the theory of circulation and wind patterns is accurate for large scale atmospheric circulation, it does not take into account changes to the circulation on a local scale. Local conditions, geological features, and other anomalies can change the wind direction and speed close to the Earth’s surface.

515G+mn0RuL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Learn more about aviation weather with Weather Flying by Robert Buck. Regarded as the bible of weather flying, this aviation classic not only continues to make complex weather concepts understandable for even the least experienced of flyers, but has now been updated to cover new advances in technology.

 

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