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Propellers

in Aircraft Systems

The propeller is a rotating airfoil, subject to induced drag, stalls, and other aerodynamic principles that apply to any airfoil. It provides the necessary thrust to pull, or in some cases push, the aircraft through the air. The engine power is used to rotate the propeller, which in turn generates thrust very similar to the manner in which a wing produces lift. The amount of thrust produced depends on the shape of the airfoil, the angle of attack of the propeller blade, and the revolutions per minute (rpm) of the engine. The propeller itself is twisted so the blade angle changes from hub to tip. The greatest angle of incidence, or the highest pitch, is at the hub while the smallest angle of incidence or smallest pitch is at the tip. [Figure 6-6]


Figure 6-6. Changes in propeller blade angle from hub to tip.

Figure 6-6. Changes in propeller blade angle from hub to tip.

The reason for the twist is to produce uniform lift from the hub to the tip. As the blade rotates, there is a difference in the actual speed of the various portions of the blade. The tip of the blade travels faster than the part near the hub, because the tip travels a greater distance than the hub in the same length of time. [Figure 6-7] Changing the angle of incidence (pitch) from the hub to the tip to correspond with the speed produces uniform lift throughout the length of the blade.  A propeller blade designed with the same angle of incidence throughout its entire length would be inefficient because as airspeed increases in flight, the portion near the hub would have a negative angle of attack while the blade tip would be stalled.

Figure 6-7. Relationship of travel distance and speed of various portions of propeller blade.

Figure 6-7. Relationship of travel distance and speed of various portions of propeller blade.

 
1 Joe October 2, 2010 at 6:19 pm

It is possible to designe propeller with constant angle of attack along all blade in all airspeeds? I have heard about technologies where propeller blade can change its shape and provide constant angle of attack in all propeller operations.

2 Keith August 13, 2011 at 10:42 pm

I fly rc. I am having trouble deciding on 2 blade or three blades I like the style and look of the three, but, everybody tells me to use a 2 blade. Given the correct application prop for a given engine which design would give me the best results. All my fellow rc’rs tell me to not use a three blade prop. Please advise

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