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Reciprocating Engines (Part Three)

in Aircraft Systems

Spark ignition four-stroke engines remain the most common design used in general aviation today. [Figure 6-4] The main parts of a spark ignition reciprocating engine include the cylinders, crankcase, and accessory housing. The intake/exhaust valves, spark plugs, and pistons are located in the cylinders. The crankshaft and connecting rods are located in the crankcase. The magnetos are normally located on the engine accessory housing.


Figure 6-4. Main components of a spark ignition reciprocating engine.

Figure 6-4. Main components of a spark ignition reciprocating engine.

In a four-stroke engine the conversion of chemical energy into mechanical energy occurs over a four stroke operating cycle. The intake, compression, power, and exhaust processes occur in four separate strokes of the piston.

  1. The intake stroke begins as the piston starts its downward travel. When this happens, the intake valve opens and the fuel/air mixture is drawn into the cylinder.
  2. The compression stroke begins when the intake valve closes and the piston starts moving back to the top of the cylinder. This phase of the cycle is used to obtain a much greater power output from the fuel/air mixture once it is ignited.
  3. The power stroke begins when the fuel/air mixture is ignited. This causes a tremendous pressure increase in the cylinder, and forces the piston downward away from the cylinder head, creating the power that turns the crankshaft.
  4. The exhaust stroke is used to purge the cylinder of burned gases. It begins when the exhaust valve opens and the piston starts to move toward the cylinder head once again.

Even when the engine is operated at a fairly low speed, the four-stroke cycle takes place several hundred times each minute. [Figure 6-5] In a four-cylinder engine, each cylinder operates on a different stroke. Continuous rotation of a crankshaft is maintained by the precise timing of the power strokes in each cylinder. Continuous operation of the engine depends on the simultaneous function of auxiliary systems, including the induction, ignition, fuel, oil, cooling, and exhaust systems.

Figure 6-5. The arrows in this illustration indicate the direction of motion of the crankshaft and piston during the four-stroke cycle.

Figure 6-5. The arrows in this illustration indicate the direction of motion of the crankshaft and piston during the four-stroke cycle.

518VcjVMo3L._SX402_BO1,204,203,200_Learn more about aircraft and their systems with A Pilot’s Guide to Aircraft and Their Systems by ASA. Pilot-oriented rather than mechanic-oriented, this guide to aircraft systems is designed specifically to help general aviation pilots understand how aircraft systems work so that they can better use them in flight.

 

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